Brown Checkout Spaces

Through Brown Checkout, MICA students and faculty are able to gain access to several flexible spaces that provide specialized equipment. The following are available for checkout:

  • A large green screen video and documentation room BR 410
  • A small green screen studio BR 417
  • A two-room audio recording studio BR 414

These spaces are useful for any students and faculty wishing to record presentations, performances, voiceovers, Foley, interviews, podcasts, and anything else that would benefit from a dedicated recording space. Brown 410 is also equipped with a large scale documentation wall for 2D and 3D art documentation.

To reserve a space, go to checkout.mica.edu. You choose the pickup date and time. A reservation can reserve the space for you but expires if you do not checkout the space within an hour of the reservation time. You can retrieve a room swipe card at the time of your checkout at Brown Checkout. Checkout of spaces is limited to 4 hours with options to extend if additional reservations are not pending.

Below are more detailed descriptions of the available spaces, including their setup, equipment and how-to videos:

Brown 410

Brown 410 is a large video recording studio with sloping green screen painted wall flush to the floor that provides sound proofed walls and an adjustable black curtains. The room is also equipped with studio lights designed for green screen shooting. There is also a documentation wall with a white homasote surface for installing 2D art and drop down paper rolls for a backdrop for 3D art.  Lighting kits and tripods are available (as well as DSLR cameras) for checkout for photo and video projects. The room may also serve to support other projects such as Foley audio recording, small performances, presentations, demonstrations, or other exhibit oriented activities.

View these orientation videos to the space:

Brown 410 Video Studio

How to Document your Work

Brown 417

This room is equipped with the One Button Studio, a user-friendly 3-step recording studio that is ideal for people unfamiliar with video technology. Just Insert a USB drive into the dock, press record, record your video presentation and just remove the drive when you are done. The Studio includes a professional HD camera, audio, and lights set up against a green screen or white curtain backdrop. This High-Tech space can be used for, recording lectures, shooting green screen footage, recording interviews, and anything else that calls for a quick and simple video operating system. The studio space is free for use to all MICA faculty, staff and students.

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View this orientation video to the space:

One Button Studio Demo

B414 A and B

Brown 414 A and B make up a professional sound recording booth and are designed to work together for professional sound recording. Room A is the control room that includes soundproofing, a Cardioid microphone, an “on air” light, a Scarlett audio interface, and a computer loaded with Pro Tools software.

Room B is equipped with soundproofing, an “on air” light, a monitor and a cardioid microphone that is connected by patch bay to the computer in Room A.  Both rooms are perfect for simple voiceovers, Foley work, podcasts, or anything else that needs crisp clean audio tracks. The rooms are available to all faculty, staff, and students through the Brown Checkout Center.

View these orientation videos to the space:

MICA Brown 414 Soundbooth

Intro to Pro Tools

Teaching with Laptops

If you missed an opportunity to attend a faculty development workshop on teaching with laptops, you can still take a look as some brief instructional videos about it below. As always you can discuss teaching and technology strategies at the Teaching Technology Center anytime!

Presenting with your Laptop from Teaching Technology Center on Vimeo.

Plugging in to teach from Teaching Technology Center on Vimeo.

Check out other instructional video projects produced by the MICA Teaching Technology Center!

How to Upload Your Moodle Syllabus

Soft Circuits with Karyn Lao

Woodshop Safety Videos
(need MICA log on to view)

Screencasting!

screenlight

What is screencasting?

Screencasting is a way to create a video recording of your computer screen. It can contain images or video of your screen as well as a voice narration which can allow users the audience to follow what you are doing.

What can I use it for?

Screencasts give educators the opportunity to integrate technology into the classroom and enhance the learning experience for students. It is useful for teaching and demonstrations  such as web or software tutorials, online teaching demonstrations, tours of web-based reference material, and online office hours using a shared screen. Screencasting can be done using a variety of free or nearly free tools such as QuickTime Screen Recorder (a native Mac application) or Screencast-o-matic (an online tool). The MICA Teaching Technology Center also has licenses for Camtasia (TechSmith) and Captivate (Adobe) which are both full-featured fee-based screencast applications you could download to your computer.  

Is there help for me to start screencasting?

The MICA Teaching Technology Center can help you with screencapture in QuickTime, Screencast-O-Matic, Captivate and Camtasia. There are many other free and nearly free options out there that you can explore on your own as well.

Check out the links below for more information and how to guides.

QuickTime Screen Recorder Steps

Screencast-O-Matic Screencasting Steps

Overview of Camtasia

 

Photo by: Gray
Licensed under creative commons some rights reserved.

Looking for a way to get that special teaching project funded? Look no further!

The Teaching Technology Center is now offering a Mini-Grant for MICA faculty interested in improving teaching and learning through innovative technologies.

If you are looking for new ways to test out technology in your teaching, you may be eligible for a $250 to $500 grant to support a project. The larger grant can support faculty who partner with a student to complete a project.

Please apply if you think your project:

  • advances the course or departmental curriculum through creative use of technology and/or innovative teaching practices, processes, assignments, or presentations, and/or
  • strives to create engaging student learning experiences by promoting 21st-century learning practices.

See this link for the application. For more detailed information about the grant and example project ideas, click here. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

 

What is Digital Literacy?

The NMC is conducting a survey to explore the benefits of digital literacy for bolstering student and faculty success.

They aim to illuminate the need for higher education institutions to integrate digital creation tools in ways that encourage the acquisition of skills such as critical thinking, creativity, and problem-solving.

Help to define digital literacy….Take the survey!

 

New Media Consortium Summer Conference 2016

From the opening plenary to the Idea Lab, the people of the NMC Summer Conference explored many great ideas and initiatives from “gaming the systems” of learning to envisioning the role of education in 2032. This article will summarize a selection of sessions we attended in the hopes of sharing some of the exciting trends and sparking new conversations of our own.

Games, Learning, and Society: The Intellectual Life of Digital Play

The first speaker of the conference guided us through her research into gaming and learning and why games are so successful in promoting literacy. She challenged the audience to see the potential of games to change the way we teach reading to boys as well as the way we approach other areas of education and assessment. That didn’t overshadow her other important message: that girls are gamers, and good ones, too! You can learn more about Constance Steinkuehler’s work here:

The Robot Storyteller: When Automation Hits Narrative Creativity and Education

A breakout session with Bryan Alexander is like discussing the plot of a science fiction novel…But wait, what will happen when we’re no longer writing them? In the session, we took brief journeys into the world of AI and robot technology. We looked at the Deep Dream Generator that takes any photo you upload, and using artificial intelligence finds and enhances patterns in images to create a new dream-like representation of that image. We also watched a team of actors act out a science-fiction script written by artificial intelligence (AI). While some AI, bots, and automated assistants can be beneficial to learning (e.g. spell check), how could AI and robot writers augment or even redefine educational experiences? For more information about Bryan’s work, check out his site: https://bryanalexanderconsulting.com/

Class of 2032

This session was a facilitated ideation exercise about what education would look like when the kindergarten students of 2016 reach the end of high school. As a thought exercise alone, it’s exciting and challenging, but with facilitation from Matt Worwood, crafty groupings, and a beach ball, we found that we could generate a wide range of ideas in a very short time. One lesson I gleaned from this exercise is how easy it is to put the future of technology and education in the context of the past. The exercise helped participants to broaden that context and think outside the classroom, think outside the internet, think outside…
Read about Matthew’s work here:

The Internet of Things: Live!

The perils and promise of the internet of things (IoT) was played out in this session. See this for a quick overview of IoT. Audience members took on the roles of the devices that in 20 years might be commonplace in the classroom and our world. Not only was the room a distracted cacophony of beeps, messages and fidgeting, we gained a sliver of insight into a possible future reality among the internet of things. Reactions from participants ranged from feelings of discomfort and discord to insights into how these “things” could, in fact, bring more learners into the fold (learning without place). Connected technologies could become so prevalent and everyday that they seem to disappear (rather than interfere), their function working seamlessly among users and learners. David Thomas and Brian Yuhnke facilitated this session.

Art School Demystified: Everybody Gets Whatever They Want

Providing technical education, equipment, space and support to art school students and faculty can be both exciting and challenging. The team approach at SAIC was presented in this session. Successful support of art and technology requires knowledgeable staff, strong leadership and a creative customer service approach. Taking this approach led the team to the guiding mantra: “Never say no, just how….” And then it hits you–it’s not that easy to say “yes” to things that may have never been done before…ever! In order for everybody to “get whatever they want,” SAIC instituted an interdepartmental art school considerations committee to tackle the tough art-making and exhibition questions involved in creating an art-making culture without boundaries. Craig Downs, Brad Johns and Alan Labb presented this session.

Student Makers of Makerspaces: A Silo-Busting Project

This session outlined a project by which art students in a furniture design course took part in the design of Mobile Units for Science Exploration (MUSE), a unique makerspace initiative at the California College of the Arts (CCA). Through collaboration among students and other stakeholders on campus, teams prototyped and implemented a “science in the studio” makerspace at the school. From a learning perspective, the initiative highlighted project-based learning and real-world experience at its core and at the same time had campus-wide benefits. Annemarie Haar, Director of Libraries at CCA led this session.

Experiencing the Buffalo State Insane Asylum: a 3D Construction and Game Narrative

This session touched on the implications of using 3D modeling and game development for documenting and teaching architectural and historical accuracies. With this technology, historically accurate models can capture an in-depth time capsule of a location. These models can easily be preserved with greater detail and accuracy compared to still photography. This allows the user to explore each room and location within the given space and gives the user the possibility to view every structure from a great (virtual) distance. This could lead to 3D modeling being an excellent teaching tool, letting students travel all over the world without leaving their classroom. Presenters were Shaun Foster, Lisa Hermsen and Trent Hergenrader.

Welcome Reception: 3D Spaces in Unreal 3D Game Development Engine (highlighted project)

One of the highlights of the NMC conference was the welcome reception in RIT’s Media Arts Games Interaction Creativity (MAGIC) Center where you could meet with RIT students and faculty involved in “making as a mode of inquiry.” One project highlighted the Unreal 4 3D game development engine that was used to create a 3D educational environment inspired by Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s “The Yellow Wallpaper.” A user is immersed instantaneously into a 3D representation of a home as you might see in the late 19th century and view and interact with art, questions and tasks that illustrate the myriad of influences on a woman’s life during that time. We could immediately see the application to teaching and learning such as: interactive online exhibitions, student and faculty 3D learning spaces and, of course, games…so we immediately set out to learn how to use it! Check out Elizabeth Goin’s blog for more information about this and other projects she is working on!

Idea Lab

One of the last sessions of the conference was the lunchtime poster session NMC-style…where you could meet and talk with educators and artists and the projects in which they are involved. Some highlights from that session include 3D printed poetry for blind students, interactive collaborative video initiatives, reimagined teaching and learning spaces and an interactive “mirror” installation memorializing black lives lost to police violence. See this link for more information!

MICA Teaching Technology How-to Guides

Addressing some of your Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), here are some How-to guides that take you step-by-step through tasks within the various online tools you use everyday – Google Apps for Education, Moodle, Online Evaluations and Adobe Connect for Web Conferencing.

Google Apps for Education @ MICA

Sharing files with Google Drive

This short guide walks you through the Google Drive sharing interface and what different things may be accomplished with Drive.

Syncing Drive to My Computer

Google Drive has an option akin to Dropbox, where you designate folder(s) on your
personal computer that are connected to an online version of that folder on Google
Drive. Syncing these folders will automatically reflect changes in both locations made online or on your computer.

Moodle@MICA

Adding your syllabus to Moodle

Syllabi are most likely to be the first thing uploaded to your Moodle course. Follow this short step-by-step guide to successfully upload any files that you might want to have online for students via Moodle.

How to add a GTI or teacher to your course page in Moodle

To grant your GTI access to things on your Moodle course page, they have
to be specifically assigned as GTI. This guide shows how to do that.

How to Import Old Course Material into a New Moodle Page.

If  you find yourself teaching the same or a similar class every semester and wish to
transfer course material from semester to semester, this tutorial will help you do just that.

Adding the Quickmail Block to your Moodle Page

Sometimes it is easier to email your students directly from your Moodle page without
switching to another browser window or email application. To have this function available to you, follow this quick how-to.

Online Evaluations with EvaluationKit @ MICA

Creating Custom Questions

Want to know what your student think about your course? This step-by-
step guide shows you how to add custom questions to the course survey.

Result Reporting for Instructors

This tutorial will guide you on how to obtain the results for end-of-semester evaluations.

Result Reporting for Administrators

This tutorial will guide you on how to access results as a departmental admin for end-of-semester evaluations.

Adobe Connect for Web Conferencing @ MICA

Adobe Connect Best Practices

Adobe Connect is a really great tool for web-conference calls with your students when
you are not physically in the classroom or have a guest lecturer/presenter call in from
off-campus. These are some best practices to keep in mind when working in
Adobe Connect.

Adobe Connect Audio Troubleshooting

If you run into problems with sound while running Adobe Connect, this guide will help you troubleshoot your web-conference.

* Don’t forget to contact us for any help with these or other teaching technologies at MICA.