Canvas ” Magic!”

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The 3rd Annual ” Magic” conference is a one day conference for instructional designers, technologist’s, and faculty alike who get together to talk about and explore new ideas for working with the Learning Management System Canvas. As MICA makes its transition to Canvas in the fall, we felt that this would be a great opportunity together new ideas and information on how to get the most out of our new LMS! Here are some highlights from the day:

Keynote: The Higher Ed Canvas: Connecting Challenges and Tools

The keynote, given by Dr. Christina Sax  from the Maryland University of Integrative Health, went into great detail about the challenges that our industry will surely face in the upcoming years.She discussed the increased need for blended learning, and gave suggestions on how we could possibly humanized the online learning experiences. How do you individualize online learning and what tools do we currently have to create those unique online experiences?

Canvas for Norming: by Laura Yoo

This Breakout session discussed an experiment held by Howard Community College faculty member Laure Yoo and her quest to figure out an interactive and productive way to use canvas as an assessment tool. Using a canvas course shell Laura had various (volunteer) faculty member pilot a new way to do norming at HCC.

The course shell was set up with modules and the volunteer faculty were set up with a student account to anonymously grade papers. Incentives such as Professional development credit were offered in exchange for participation. In the end, they discovered that perhaps it would be better to have a set rubric to work off of and that this method of norming could potentially show a trend in student work over time. However, grading differences between faculty resulted in some challenges.Over all,this study produced interesting results, with both positive and negative results. This idea has a great potential for the future of norming using readily available tools.

 

Laying the Foundation: Penn State’s Approach to Building faculty support for Transition to Canvas LMS

This session was very helpful, as people from three different teams within the Penn State community discussed there techniques, trials, and tribulations from moving from the LMS Angel to Canvas. Being such a large university presents it unique challenges for the school, and they took a campus by campus approach to the migration. Some campus’s have been completely migrated for over a year now, while others are still hanging on to angel with all of their might.

In order to make their transition as smooth as possible they employed a multitude of different support methods such as virtual office hours, a help request portal, as well a learning center dedicated to the canvas LMS.While not every school has the resources that penn state does, there was some good new innovative ideas shared on how to make sure that help is accessible to every faculty member, whether it be online or in person, at times that are convenient for them. This produces happier and more involved faculty which creates a better learning environment for the students overall.

Canvas UX Research: Leveraging User experience Research to Understand student Preferences to Improve Canvas course design

Another group from Penn state showed their discoveries of a study that attempted to figure out what students were looking for in their LMS experience,particularly within canvas. The study aimed to try and really understand how students navigate and function within the confines of the system itself. Over the course of their study they discover that students want their work front and center. Modules are the most preferred homepage arrangements, and students cared the most about due dates, timely instructions and a course outline. The students also reacted positively to a more branded website, where they were reminded every step of the way to what school they were taking part in. Overall it was very insightful and will create a more overall user friendly experience within canvas for students and faculty alike.

 

Canvas+Google=Happy Pandas!

This Breakout session, given by Beth Crook from St. Andrew’s school of Delaware was a wonderful look into demonstrating the endless capability with the google LTI integrated into the canvas interface. Sharing photo galleries that can be automatically updated without logging into canvas through google drive, creating cloud assignments that move documents over to students drives and let them submit their own person copy of your doc without ever leaving the canvas environment. Google and Canvas work in seamless harmony that will make everyone using both systems jump for joy! These tools create a powerful new way to make the most out of google apps for education and integrate technology with MICA’s online learning environment. Canvas+ Google indeed makes Happy Pandas!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DSLR Basics Course

MICA faculty! Do you need help documenting your work or supporting students in the same? Want to explore your Digital SLR camera in greater detail? Skillshare, a MOOC provider, is offering a free course in DSLR Basics right now, and a free month of Skillshare Premium. This is an easy way to build some new skills that can be put to immediate use!

Fundamentals of DSLR Photography

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**Need to check out a camera at MICA to test out your skills or work on a project? MICA faculty can check out a DSLR Camera from the Teaching Technology Center by emailing acadtech@mica.edu.

Brown Checkout Spaces

Through Brown Checkout, MICA students and faculty are able to gain access to several flexible spaces that provide specialized equipment. The following are available for checkout:

  • A large green screen video and documentation room BR 410
  • A small green screen studio BR 417
  • A two-room audio recording studio BR 414

These spaces are useful for any students and faculty wishing to record presentations, performances, voiceovers, Foley, interviews, podcasts, and anything else that would benefit from a dedicated recording space. Brown 410 is also equipped with a large scale documentation wall for 2D and 3D art documentation.

To reserve a space, go to checkout.mica.edu. You choose the pickup date and time. A reservation can reserve the space for you but expires if you do not checkout the space within an hour of the reservation time. You can retrieve a room swipe card at the time of your checkout at Brown Checkout. Checkout of spaces is limited to 4 hours with options to extend if additional reservations are not pending.

Below are more detailed descriptions of the available spaces, including their setup, equipment and how-to videos:

Brown 410

Brown 410 is a large video recording studio with sloping green screen painted wall flush to the floor that provides sound proofed walls and an adjustable black curtains. The room is also equipped with studio lights designed for green screen shooting. There is also a documentation wall with a white homasote surface for installing 2D art and drop down paper rolls for a backdrop for 3D art.  Lighting kits and tripods are available (as well as DSLR cameras) for checkout for photo and video projects. The room may also serve to support other projects such as Foley audio recording, small performances, presentations, demonstrations, or other exhibit oriented activities.

View these orientation videos to the space:

Brown 410 Video Studio

How to Document your Work

Brown 417

This room is equipped with the One Button Studio, a user-friendly 3-step recording studio that is ideal for people unfamiliar with video technology. Just Insert a USB drive into the dock, press record, record your video presentation and just remove the drive when you are done. The Studio includes a professional HD camera, audio, and lights set up against a green screen or white curtain backdrop. This High-Tech space can be used for, recording lectures, shooting green screen footage, recording interviews, and anything else that calls for a quick and simple video operating system. The studio space is free for use to all MICA faculty, staff and students.

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View this orientation video to the space:

One Button Studio Demo

B414 A and B

Brown 414 A and B make up a professional sound recording booth and are designed to work together for professional sound recording. Room A is the control room that includes soundproofing, a Cardioid microphone, an “on air” light, a Scarlett audio interface, and a computer loaded with Pro Tools software.

Room B is equipped with soundproofing, an “on air” light, a monitor and a cardioid microphone that is connected by patch bay to the computer in Room A.  Both rooms are perfect for simple voiceovers, Foley work, podcasts, or anything else that needs crisp clean audio tracks. The rooms are available to all faculty, staff, and students through the Brown Checkout Center.

View these orientation videos to the space:

MICA Brown 414 Soundbooth

Intro to Pro Tools

Teaching with Laptops

If you missed an opportunity to attend a faculty development workshop on teaching with laptops, you can still take a look as some brief instructional videos about it below. As always you can discuss teaching and technology strategies at the Teaching Technology Center anytime!

Presenting with your Laptop from Teaching Technology Center on Vimeo.

Plugging in to teach from Teaching Technology Center on Vimeo.

Check out other instructional video projects produced by the MICA Teaching Technology Center!

How to Upload Your Moodle Syllabus

Soft Circuits with Karyn Lao

Woodshop Safety Videos
(need MICA log on to view)

Screencasting!

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What is screencasting?

Screencasting is a way to create a video recording of your computer screen. It can contain images or video of your screen as well as a voice narration which can allow users the audience to follow what you are doing.

What can I use it for?

Screencasts give educators the opportunity to integrate technology into the classroom and enhance the learning experience for students. It is useful for teaching and demonstrations  such as web or software tutorials, online teaching demonstrations, tours of web-based reference material, and online office hours using a shared screen. Screencasting can be done using a variety of free or nearly free tools such as QuickTime Screen Recorder (a native Mac application) or Screencast-o-matic (an online tool). The MICA Teaching Technology Center also has licenses for Camtasia (TechSmith) and Captivate (Adobe) which are both full-featured fee-based screencast applications you could download to your computer.  

Is there help for me to start screencasting?

The MICA Teaching Technology Center can help you with screencapture in QuickTime, Screencast-O-Matic, Captivate and Camtasia. There are many other free and nearly free options out there that you can explore on your own as well.

Check out the links below for more information and how to guides.

QuickTime Screen Recorder Steps

Screencast-O-Matic Screencasting Steps

Overview of Camtasia

 

Photo by: Gray
Licensed under creative commons some rights reserved.

Looking for a way to get that special teaching project funded? Look no further!

The Teaching Technology Center is now offering a Mini-Grant for MICA faculty interested in improving teaching and learning through innovative technologies.

If you are looking for new ways to test out technology in your teaching, you may be eligible for a $250 to $500 grant to support a project. The larger grant can support faculty who partner with a student to complete a project.

Please apply if you think your project:

  • advances the course or departmental curriculum through creative use of technology and/or innovative teaching practices, processes, assignments, or presentations, and/or
  • strives to create engaging student learning experiences by promoting 21st-century learning practices.

See this link for the application. For more detailed information about the grant and example project ideas, click here. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

 

What is Digital Literacy?

The NMC is conducting a survey to explore the benefits of digital literacy for bolstering student and faculty success.

They aim to illuminate the need for higher education institutions to integrate digital creation tools in ways that encourage the acquisition of skills such as critical thinking, creativity, and problem-solving.

Help to define digital literacy….Take the survey!