Telling a Linear Narrative on a Timeline using “Timeline JS”

Teaching history can often require presenting a chronology or a timeline of events. Timeline JS is an online timeline creation tool and a great resource that can be used to present a linear narrative in an interactive, intuitive, and organized way.

Timeline JS is easy to use by just following a few steps outlined in the video above and summarized briefly below:

  • Go to http://timeline.knightlab.com
  • Then click “Make a timeline now”
  • The website will walk you through a few steps:
    • Download the Google Spreadsheet template provided
    • Add the necessary information on the template. Information should contain dates and can include text, YouTube video, SoundCloud audio, images, etc.
    • When you finish adding all of the information you would like to be on your timeline, click File, Publish to the Web in the Google Spreadsheet menu
    • Google will generate a link that will need to be pasted on the Timeline JS website in step number 3: Copy/Paste Spreadsheet URL
    • Click Preview if you want to preview your timeline.
    • In Step 4 you can find a code to embed the finished timeline in a site of your choosing (such as Moodle, WordPress or another web site).

Below is a more detailed video that you can follow for more information.

There are other timeline/mapping tools out there with different approaches to storytelling that may suit your unique teaching style.

Here are some examples:

If geography and maps are more relevant to your teaching material, try Storymap JS to organize and present chronological events on geographical maps.

If you want to tell story about a picture where you can zoom in for example to point out brush strokes or a certain painting technique or to compare and contrast paintings pr pictures, try Gigapixel.

These are some easy ways to engage students in content while incorporating technology into your teaching. Try them out!

New Art History App for Teaching!

It might just change the way Art History is taught and learned…Want a sneak peek? Search “Wolff” in the Apple App Store.

Some snippets from the article announcing it’s launch:

“Wolff, an art history iPad application, uses a streamlined interface to bring crowd-sourced, high-resolution artwork to users in classroom and academic settings.”

“We want to place high-resolution artwork images in the hands of people in a way that is functional and beautiful,” Bryda said, noting that the application will help the art history discipline keep up with the changing technological landscape.

For more information on the article from the Yale Daily News, go to: http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2015/02/12/new-art-history-app-launched/

Reminder Restoring and Importing into Classroom (Moodle)

Last semester the Office of Academic Technology started archiving all Moodle courses on classroom.mica.edu with the exception of the current (running) semester. On February 27, 2015 all Fall 2014 courses will be archived. Courses will not be deleted – only archived! If you reuse content on Moodle from past semesters you will have many options available to you going forward.

You may choose one of the following ways to prepare to teach using Moodle if you use past semester materials:

  1. Manage course files outside of Moodle and use the easy drag and drop function to create and organize your Moodle course each semester.
  2. Manage course backups independently by backing up and downloading course backups at the end of each semester, and restoring them to future course iterations. This takes a few steps and may require you to attend brief training, review documentation, or request support at the beginning of the semester.
  3. Contact Academic Technology at the start of the semester to receive a back up file from a previous semester. You can meet with me, attend training or follow instructions to restore the file to your new course.
  4. Contact Academic Technology at the start of the semester to restore a course for you.

Please allow for a turnaround time of 5 business days for Academic Technology requests, especially at the start of a semester.

Here is a link to the policy: http://www.mica.edu/Faculty/Academic_Technology_Training_Center/Academic_Technology_Policy.html

Feel free to schedule a consultation by contacting the Director of Academic Technology at acadtech@mica.edu.

Events:

https://academictechnologymica.wordpress.com/category/academic-technology/events-academic-technology/ 

Google Workshop at MICA Next Week!

Ever wonder what Google Hangouts is and how to use it to connect to individuals or groups online? Google Apps provide a variety of tools for teachers and students to connect, organize and share online. Come to a workshop on Wednesday, January 28th from 12 – 2pm in Bunting 360 for a workshop on the following topics:

Google Drive (with all the fun inclusions like documents, sheets, presentations, drawing)

Google Hangouts
Google Sites
Picasa
Google Scholar
Please RSVP to acadtech@mica.edu.

VoiceThread and Best Practices

voicethread

http://voicethread.com

 

Screen Shot 2014-11-13 at 2.40.11 PM

What is VoiceThread?

With VoiceThread, group conversations are collected from anywhere in the world at any time and shared in one place, all with no software to install. A VoiceThread is a collaborative, interactive, multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos. It allows people to navigate through the slides and leave comments in 5 ways: using voice (with a microphone or telephone), text, audio file (for VoiceThread Pro users), or video (via a webcam). Share a VoiceThread with friends, students, and colleagues so they can record comments, too.
(Taken from: http://voicethread.com/support/howto/Basics/Introduction/)

Three Best Practices

  • Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome are the best browsers to use with VoiceThread.
  • Download or update Flash.
  • Enable Cookies. This is the easiest way to ensure that VoiceThread can function properly.

There is help if you would like to test run your VoiceThread presentation before using it for a class.

VoiceThread for Art Teaching and Learning

View these example for ideas on how it could be used in your classroom!

American Art: Searching for Values by Constance Vidor
http://voicethread.com/about/library/americanart/

Be sure to view past the first few slides. Here the instructor narrates through pages (and not others) even though students will be viewing and interacting on those same pages. Student comments can be audio, video or text!

• • •

Higher Ed Online Learning from Michelle Pacansky-Brock “Photography from Inception to Digital”
http://voicethread.com/about/library/Higher_Ed_Online_Learning_from_Michelle_PacanskyBrock/

I truly like the collaborative nature of this example that includes lecture as well as guided discussion. All of this happens asynchronously with some comments in text and others in a recorded voice. Imagine whether you could get this level of interaction in a large live lecture.

If you are interested in VoiceThread, limited licenses are available for MICA faculty. For troubleshooting questions and information, please contact the Office of Academic Technology acadtech@mica.edu or visit: http://docs.voicethread.com/category/troubleshooting/

Art History Digital Resources

Art Teaching Resources

Below is a brief list of Art History teaching resources, a video library and an interactive museum site. Please add to this or comment!

Art History Teaching Resources

Various contributors from teachers to curators to art experts share their knowledge, resources and experience at this site.

82nd & Fifth

Explore the interactive site of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Watch select episodes or explore art media on your own.

Smarthistory

In Khan Academy fashion, Smarthistory provides free open art history videos and articles for your use in teaching.

Some reviews on the resources above:

Smarthistory Review

82nd & Fifth Review

Lynda.com Improvements To Come Soon

We’re looking for volunteers to test some new Lynda functionality that was released in beta on October 23. If you are interested, contact me at pstefanuca@mica.edu.

If you participate, you can explore and test a new interface on Lynda.com where you will be able to build playlists comprised of individual videos, or sections of courses.

Specifically, you will be able to:

  • Add courses or individual videos to a playlist
  • Drag and drop courses, videos, chapters, and more into a playlist
  • Enable or disable videos or chapters within a course in a playlist
  • Watch a playlist from start to finish on a single page

In the beta environment, you can switch back to the current playlist functionality by clicking Use classic layout at the upper right of your playlist page.

Just in case you forgot…

What is Lynda? Lynda is an online video library that MICA subscribes to where you can access thousands of instructional video tutorials.

How do I access Lynda? Go to your MICA portal at http://www.mica.edu and log in. On the left menu, click on Academic Resources where you will find a link to Lynda!