Printing the Pieta

Okay so it’s just one small part of the Pieta: a detail of Mary, but I printed this to illustrate the value to teaching and learning of being able to touch the art – the untouchable art.

Can you think of applications for this in the classroom?

pieta print crop.jpg

Other Resources:

Design Make Teach: A blog about digital fabrication in the classroom

Why 3D Printing Needs To Take Off in Schools Around The World

Michelangelo, Pieta (Khan Academy video)

Please Feel the Museum: The Emergence of 3D Printing and Scanning

 

 

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Online Collaboration: An Interview with Ginger Spivey

Ginger Spivey, Art Matters instructor, shares tips and tricks as well as the methods and tools she used in her class to establish an environment where collaboration amongst students could thrive. In the interview she explains how she uses GoogleDocs and WordPress as tools for collaborative projects. She also mentions the challenges in establishing a collaborative environment when “students start getting really caught up with the traditional structure in higher education.” Spivey encourages her students to focus more on the final, collaborative products rather than what individuals do because that way of thinking can hinder a collaborative process. You can hear more details on collaborative process and the tools she uses in this interview below.

Ginger Spivey Interview on Collaboration

Telling a Linear Narrative on a Timeline using “Timeline JS”

Teaching history can often require presenting a chronology or a timeline of events. Timeline JS is an online timeline creation tool and a great resource that can be used to present a linear narrative in an interactive, intuitive, and organized way.

Timeline JS is easy to use by just following a few steps outlined in the video above and summarized briefly below:

  • Go to http://timeline.knightlab.com
  • Then click “Make a timeline now”
  • The website will walk you through a few steps:
    • Download the Google Spreadsheet template provided
    • Add the necessary information on the template. Information should contain dates and can include text, YouTube video, SoundCloud audio, images, etc.
    • When you finish adding all of the information you would like to be on your timeline, click File, Publish to the Web in the Google Spreadsheet menu
    • Google will generate a link that will need to be pasted on the Timeline JS website in step number 3: Copy/Paste Spreadsheet URL
    • Click Preview if you want to preview your timeline.
    • In Step 4 you can find a code to embed the finished timeline in a site of your choosing (such as Moodle, WordPress or another web site).

Below is a more detailed video that you can follow for more information.

There are other timeline/mapping tools out there with different approaches to storytelling that may suit your unique teaching style.

Here are some examples:

If geography and maps are more relevant to your teaching material, try Storymap JS to organize and present chronological events on geographical maps.

If you want to tell story about a picture where you can zoom in for example to point out brush strokes or a certain painting technique or to compare and contrast paintings pr pictures, try Gigapixel.

These are some easy ways to engage students in content while incorporating technology into your teaching. Try them out!

New Art History App for Teaching!

It might just change the way Art History is taught and learned…Want a sneak peek? Search “Wolff” in the Apple App Store.

Some snippets from the article announcing it’s launch:

“Wolff, an art history iPad application, uses a streamlined interface to bring crowd-sourced, high-resolution artwork to users in classroom and academic settings.”

“We want to place high-resolution artwork images in the hands of people in a way that is functional and beautiful,” Bryda said, noting that the application will help the art history discipline keep up with the changing technological landscape.

For more information on the article from the Yale Daily News, go to: http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2015/02/12/new-art-history-app-launched/