Screencasting!

screenlight

What is screencasting?

Screencasting is a way to create a video recording of your computer screen. It can contain images or video of your screen as well as a voice narration which can allow users the audience to follow what you are doing.

What can I use it for?

Screencasts give educators the opportunity to integrate technology into the classroom and enhance the learning experience for students. It is useful for teaching and demonstrations  such as web or software tutorials, online teaching demonstrations, tours of web-based reference material, and online office hours using a shared screen. Screencasting can be done using a variety of free or nearly free tools such as QuickTime Screen Recorder (a native Mac application) or Screencast-o-matic (an online tool). The MICA Teaching Technology Center also has licenses for Camtasia (TechSmith) and Captivate (Adobe) which are both full-featured fee-based screencast applications you could download to your computer.  

Is there help for me to start screencasting?

The MICA Teaching Technology Center can help you with screencapture in QuickTime, Screencast-O-Matic, Captivate and Camtasia. There are many other free and nearly free options out there that you can explore on your own as well.

Check out the links below for more information and how to guides.

QuickTime Screen Recorder Steps

Screencast-O-Matic Screencasting Steps

Overview of Camtasia

 

Photo by: Gray
Licensed under creative commons some rights reserved.
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Bloemfontein Courant | Students interacting across board

MICA Photo Faculty Colette Veasey-Cullors and MICA photo students have recently embarked on an online course collaboration and shared exhibition with students from the Department of Design and Studio Art at Bloemfontein’s Central University of Technology in South Africa. You can find details of their online activities and more in the article below!

Bloemfontein Courant | Students interacting across board.

Where is Bloemfontein?

VoiceThread and Best Practices

voicethread

http://voicethread.com

 

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What is VoiceThread?

With VoiceThread, group conversations are collected from anywhere in the world at any time and shared in one place, all with no software to install. A VoiceThread is a collaborative, interactive, multimedia slide show that holds images, documents, and videos. It allows people to navigate through the slides and leave comments in 5 ways: using voice (with a microphone or telephone), text, audio file (for VoiceThread Pro users), or video (via a webcam). Share a VoiceThread with friends, students, and colleagues so they can record comments, too.
(Taken from: http://voicethread.com/support/howto/Basics/Introduction/)

Three Best Practices

  • Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome are the best browsers to use with VoiceThread.
  • Download or update Flash.
  • Enable Cookies. This is the easiest way to ensure that VoiceThread can function properly.

There is help if you would like to test run your VoiceThread presentation before using it for a class.

VoiceThread for Art Teaching and Learning

View these example for ideas on how it could be used in your classroom!

American Art: Searching for Values by Constance Vidor
http://voicethread.com/about/library/americanart/

Be sure to view past the first few slides. Here the instructor narrates through pages (and not others) even though students will be viewing and interacting on those same pages. Student comments can be audio, video or text!

• • •

Higher Ed Online Learning from Michelle Pacansky-Brock “Photography from Inception to Digital”
http://voicethread.com/about/library/Higher_Ed_Online_Learning_from_Michelle_PacanskyBrock/

I truly like the collaborative nature of this example that includes lecture as well as guided discussion. All of this happens asynchronously with some comments in text and others in a recorded voice. Imagine whether you could get this level of interaction in a large live lecture.

If you are interested in VoiceThread, limited licenses are available for MICA faculty. For troubleshooting questions and information, please contact the Office of Academic Technology acadtech@mica.edu or visit: http://docs.voicethread.com/category/troubleshooting/

Backwards and in High Heels: Teaching (Well) Online

Backwards and in High Heels: Teaching (Well) Online

A nice read if you are thinking about teaching online…It focuses on technology as the means, and teaching as the method. Without good teaching practice, the framework (choreography?) of an online course cannot stand alone….much less dance in heels backwards!

Also see some great references included at the end – including eBook Distance Education for Teacher Training by Mary Burns.

Enjoy!